Gum Disease | Dentist in Hackensack NJ Dentistry

Gum Disease

Gum disease

Gum Disease

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a condition in which the gums and bone around the teeth become infected. It is caused by plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that forms on the teeth. Plaque can harden into tartar, which can cause the gums to become inflamed.

If gum disease is not treated, it can lead to tooth loss. It is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults.

Gum disease is usually painless, so many people do not know they have it. The early stage of it is called gingivitis. Gingivitis is a milder form of gum disease. It can usually be reversed with good oral hygiene.

If gingivitis is not treated, it can progress to periodontitis. Periodontitis is a more serious form of it. It can destroy the gums and bones around the teeth. Periodontitis is a major cause of tooth loss in adults.

Gum disease is caused by plaque. Plaque is a sticky film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva. Plaque forms on the teeth and gums. If plaque is not removed, it can harden into tartar.

What is gum disease?

Gum disease is an infection of the gums that can eventually lead to tooth loss.

It is caused by plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that forms on teeth. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed and bleed easily. If plaque is not removed, it can harden and turn into tartar. Tartar can irritate the gums and cause them to pull away from the teeth, creating pockets. Bacteria can grow in these pockets and cause further damage.

What is the main cause of gum disease?

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a condition in which the gums and bone around the teeth become infected. The main cause of it is plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that constantly forms on the teeth. If plaque is not removed, it can harden and turn into tartar. Tartar can irritate the gums and cause them to become inflamed. The inflammation can eventually lead to it.

Can gum diseases be cured?

Most gum diseases can be cured if they are caught early. The first step is to improve your oral hygiene. This means brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing at least once a day. If you have any form of gum disease, your dentist may also recommend using an antibacterial mouthwash.

If your gum disease is more severe, you may need to have a deep cleaning. This is a procedure where the dentist or hygienist removes tartar and plaque from below the gum line. They may also need to smooth out any rough spots on your teeth where bacteria can hide.

If your gum disease does not improve with these measures, you may need surgery. Surgery for it is called a flap procedure. The surgeon will make small cuts in your gum tissue and lift it away from your teeth. They will then remove the tartar and plaque. The gum tissue is then put back in place and stitched up.

After surgery, you will need to take care of your teeth and gums to make sure the gum disease does not come back. You will need to brush and floss daily and see your dentist regularly.

How do dentists treat it?

The most common way to treat gum disease is through a process called scaling and root planning. This process involves the removal of plaque and tartar from the teeth and gums. A local anesthetic is usually used to numb the area before the procedure is performed.

After the plaque and tartar are removed, the dentist will smooth out the root surfaces to prevent bacteria from re-attaching to the teeth. In some cases, antibiotics may be prescribed to help control the infection.

What are two signs that you have it?

If you have it, your gums may bleed when you brush your teeth. You may also have bad breath.

It is caused by plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that forms on your teeth. Plaque can harden into tartar, which can cause your gums to become inflamed.

If you have gum disease, your dentist may recommend that you have a professional cleaning. He or she may also prescribe antibiotics or recommend mouthwash.

You can call us at 201-457-1010 or visit us at our Gentle Dental Service clinic in Hackensack, New Jersey.

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